Veronika Csonka
Glasspool


Cairo Contemporary, Budapest


1071 Budapest, Lövölde tér 7.

2024 July 5 - August 4


On view: 0-24h

In her art, Veronika Csonka reflects on technological innovations and the reason for their creation.
A significant part of today's technological developments is created in order to neutralize and reverse the damage caused by industrial overproduction, both past and present. The damage caused has a major impact on land and natural waters as living territories, and thus the organically existing conditions of plant and animal populations are being adversely affected. Some species adapt very quickly to the changing living conditions, but there are many species that would disappear. In these cases, human intervention is needed. Artificial habitats are created to preserve endangered species.

The artist’s work focuses on situations in which living creatures are taken out of their own context and placed into a new environment with artificially created living conditions. Instead of their natural environment, they are in engineered systems (e.g. vats, water tanks ) where machines, devices and sensors provide the conditions for existence.

For the artist, these situations are, among other things, about servitude, adaptation, progress, care, but they are paradoxical situations in which the will to find a solution is as much present as the uncertainty.
Her installations and objects can be considered as spatial drawings, drawn with a 3D pen, centimetre by centimetre. They are made of recycled plastic, complemented by stainless steel supports.

Veronika Csonka born in 1992 in Siófok, Hungary, currently living and working in Budapest. She graduated from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts as a visual artist in 2019, and as a teacher of fine arts in 2021.

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Curator: Gábor Pintér
Supported by Erzsébetváros Municipality
Cooperation partner: Bischitz Johanna Integrated Human Service Centre

instagram.com/Cairo.Contemporary
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Bárdi Dominik
Pantry


Cairo Contemporary, Budapest


1071 Budapest, Lövölde tér 7.

2024, August 8 - September 3


On view: 0-24h

The pantry carries the association of a homely environment. Grandma's preserves lining up is a lovely memory in our minds. Although the artist was interested in the collective, common moments of remembrance during the creation process, it is not a historical memory, but the reminiscence of childhood.  The process of reminiscence is important to the artist, the way an object strokes back moments of our past. The melting wax is a metaphor for the intimate family idyll. The jars are in different colours and we associate different flavours with them. There is also the problem of the half-empty or half-full question: just as the wax imitates the inner content of the empty glass, it fills it with meaning.

Dominik Bárdi has been working for more than a year on the representation of transparency, mainly using sculptural means. He creates images and reliefs with wax and light. Most of these works are reliefs on a glass surface with two complementary or even contradictory views. He patterns the wax on the glass surface so that light can easily pass through. The recipe of relief changes and a new, reserve patterning is needed. The darker the image, the thicker the layer of wax. The view through the glass can never be completely sharp, so only sudden changes in thickness can give a sense of tonal variation. While one side appears to be a photo-like relief, the other side appears to be an almost uninterpretable relief, a kind of negative of the relief: the darker parts are the high parts and the illuminated parts are the low parts.

Dominik Bárdi was born in 2000 and is currently a sculpture student at the Hungarian University of Fine Arts. He was awarded a Ludwig scholarship in 2023. His work has been shown in group exhibitions at MAMŰ Gallery and ISBN Gallery, among others. His chosen themes often include everyday elements. He often uses found objects and his work is also characterised by the evocation of childhood.

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Curator: Gábor Pintér
Supported by Erzsébetváros Municipality
Cooperation partner: Bischitz Johanna Integrated Human Service Centre

instagram.com/Cairo.Contemporary
instagram.com/parallel.art.foundation
 
   


Nóra Juhász
Dark Side of The Moon


Cairo Contemporary, Budapest

1071 Budapest, Lövölde tér 7.

2024, September 8-28

On view: 0-24h

Dark Side of The Moon may have a soul, though not sure.
Perhaps some, not none; after all, they are themselves a somebody, or at least something.
Perhaps there are reasons for their behaviour.
Perhaps we will find out one day.
Until then, what else can we do, we wait.

The Dark Side of The Moon is based on a simple principle: it denies the viewer the bare minimum of what is reasonable. The minimum that we unknowingly await, expect, but it just does not come. And it does not come. And it does not come.

Dark Side of The Moon is this denial in the flesh. An installation that is not interested in the viewer. An exhibited object that says no. A rude freak. A cold presence. A lonely planet.  

Nóra Juhász (Budapest, 1993) is a contemporary interdisciplinary artist and theatre-maker. In their cross-media projects, they explore communication, information sharing and the relationship between the individual and society. Their theatre and visual art projects are both socially contextualised, conceptual and playfully ironic. In recent years, role-playing and the use of virtual tools have become a dominant element of their practice. In 2024, they were granted the Stiftung Berliner Leben „Fresh A.I.R.” residency programme and were awarded the Gyula Derkovits Visual Art Scholarship.

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Curator: Gábor Pintér
Supported by Erzsébetváros Municipality
Cooperation partner: Bischitz Johanna Integrated Human Service Centre

instagram.com/Cairo.Contemporary
instagram.com/parallel.art.foundation

   


Nóra Szabó
Honey bones


Cairo Contemporary

1071 Budapest, Lövölde tér 7.


2024, May 2 - June 9


On view 0-24h

The bone sculptures in Nóra Szabó’s installation are characterized by an uncanny mix of the aesthetics of water erosion on geological formations and the traces of the fourth industrial revolution. They are like skeletal structures of a kind of speculative future, while also bearing the mark of fossilized remnants of the past. They seem to break free from the grip of linear time, presenting both the yet-to-be and the no-longer-existing. Their pseudo-archeological appearance reminds us of humanity's ongoing search for meaning amidst the changing narrative of existence. In each of their pieces lurks some anomaly that contradicts the teleological approach to evolution, presenting a dynamic process shaped by different environmental influences, genetic mutations and chance events.

Nóra Szabó's art is an immersion in the contemporary visual representation of the human body. She explores the possible connections between the radical change in the concept of the body and the development of technology. Her research draws primarily on a framework of post-humanist theories. Szabó argues that the natural body undergoes a process of change when it encounters artificial materials, as a result of which the concept of the human body is a hybrid; the artificial is intertwined with the organic. Therefore, he relies on an intermediate basis for his work, combining analogue making with digital techniques.

Nóra Szabó is currently a PhD student at the Hungarian University of Fine Arts. She is a member of the Skurc Group art association in Budapest and a Barcsay Prize-winning artist. He was nominated for the Kepesita Collection Prize in 2020 and 2023. She has had solo and group exhibitions at AQB Project Space, Budapest; Sopa Gallery, Kosice; PINCE, Budapest; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest.

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Curator: Gábor Pintér
Supported by Erzsébetváros Municipality - Cultural District Catalyst Grant
Cooperation partner: Bischitz Johanna Integrated Human Service Centre

   
 
instagram.com/Cairo.Contemporary
instagram.com/parallel.art.foundation

Lakin Ogunbanwo [NGR]
are we good enough


2024.04.03–29.
Cairo Contemporary


The exhibition is a part of the official program of Budapest Photo Festival 2024.

Lakin Ogunbanwo’s project began in 2012 when he first became interested in the traditional dress of ethnic groups in Nigeria: the Yoruba, Ibo and Hausa-Fulani and others. Dress is a very clear indicator of ethnic identity in Nigeria and Ogunbanwo has observed the younger generation creating contemporary hybrids of western and traditional, reinventing the visual codes through which they publicly communicated aspects of themselves.

Ogunbanwo’s new body of work is a series of enigmatic portraits that explore identity. By purposefully obscuring the individual identity of the sitters, the artist draws attention to what it is that defines an individual within a larger cultural collective; who this individual may be and how they want to be perceived. He has pared down the communicative aspect of the project to the power of the hat – ‘that witty but vital accessory in fashion’ – to speak of masculine identity. In Ogunbanwo’s signature style of elegant minimalism the aesthetic focus in this series, as in the rest of his work, is on light, texture, shape and silhouette.

Born in Lagos, Nigeria in 1987 Lakin Ogunbanwo studied law before beginning work as a photographer in 2012. His work has been featured in the Times New York, Harpers Bazaar, British GQ and Riposte Magazine. His exhibitions include Lagos Photo Festival; 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair, London and Grid Photo Biennial, Cape Town South Africa. Ogunbanwo has been recognised by the British Journal of Photography as one of the Top 25 Photographers of 2015 in their annual Ones to Watch edition.

 
Curator: Gábor Pintér
Supported by Erzsébetváros Municipality - Cultural District Catalyst Grant
Cooperation partner: Bischitz Johanna Integrated Human Service Centre

www.parallelfoundation.com
instagram.com/Cairo.Contemporary
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